Cleveland-Marshall Selected as a Top J.D. Tax Program

PreLaw magazine recently selected Cleveland-Marshall College of Law as having one of the 39 best J.D. tax programs in the country. C|M was the only Ohio law school selected for this prestigious designation. See https://www.bluetoad.com/publication/frame.php?i=623148&p=1&pn=&ver=html5.

C|M’s achievement is due in part to its rich tax curriculum, which is deeper than found in many J.D. programs. As tax LL.M. programs have proliferated (elective one-year, graduate degrees in law that are earned after the J.D. is completed), many law schools have reduced the number of tax course offerings at the J.D. level, thus forcing those students interested in pursuing a tax practice to incur the additional time and extra expense of earning a tax LL.M. degree. Consistent with C-M’s value proposition of preparing lawyers not only well but at a reasonable cost, Cleveland-Marshall has resisted this trend and offers a panoply of tax courses that prepares our J.D. students well for the practice of tax law. For those students who nevertheless choose to pursue a tax LL.M., Cleveland-Marshall students have a reputation at the major tax LL.M. programs of being particularly well prepared for graduate study.

Our students study not only the Federal income taxation of individuals, corporations, and partnerships but also such advanced topics as the taxation of international transactions (both inbound and outbound) and of corporate mergers and acquisitions. They learn about the tax-efficient transfer of wealth from one generation to the next, about tax crimes and tax practice and procedure before both courts and the IRS, and about the taxation of tax-exempt organizations. With such training, C|M graduates have had notable success, obtaining positions not only with private law and accounting firms but also with wealth management firms, the IRS Chief Counsel Office, the U.S. Department of Justice, Tax Division, and major corporations (as in-house corporate tax counsel).

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